Recent Dirt & Gravel Road Projects

Numbers referenced on the map above:
  1. Maintenance on Noel Road was completed by Cook Township in the fall of 2007. The entire length of the road was improved by raising the road’s profile and installing grade breaks to direct water off the road’s surface. This was completed with $13,300 of Westmoreland County’s Dirt and Gravel Road allotment.
  2. The initial Ridge Road project was completed by Donegal Township in April of 2008. The township has made large improvements to the entire road. They started at the bottom of the road and replaced the degraded culvert with $4,826 of Westmoreland County’s Dirt and Gravel Road allotment.
  3. Constructing a drain for Stairs Road

    Donegal Township completed the rehabilitation of Stairs Road in 2010. The project was started using a Growing Greener grant. The Township used $22,000 of Westmoreland County’s Dirt and Gravel Road allotment to install Driving Surface Aggregate (DSA). This stone mixture has proven affective at minimizing erosion of the surface of the road.

  4. Runoff and erosion occuring on Mansfield Road

    Mansville Road in Cook Township was the first project to receive the full allotment of Westmoreland County’s Dirt and Gravel Road allotment for a single year. The project was funded in this manner because the Quality Assurance Board felt the road was severely degraded, and a top priority for the program. In 2010 the Township used $23,762 to complete the first phase of this project by raising the road’s profile and installing cross-pipe(s) to direct water off the road’s surface. The second phase will use $14,000 to complete additional work on Mansville Road in 2011.

  5. Restored Church Camp road helps drain stormwater

    Phase One of Church Camp Road maintenance was completed by Fairfield Township in October of 2007. The township’s goal was to stabilize the steep road adjacent to Antiochian Village. To accomplish this they used $5,487 of Westmoreland County’s Dirt and Gravel Road allotment to remove water from the deep roadside ditch. This was accomplished using traditional piping that drained to an infiltrating level spreader, which was a new and innovative technique for the Dirt and Gravel Road program.

  6. Clark Hollow Road in fall

    The Clark Hollow Road maintenance project was completed by Fairfield Township in October of 2008. This site was a showcase for the annual state-wide Dirt and Gravel Roads workshop. The project features shallow cross-pipe (5) installation with a grade break incorporated into the pipe placement. This technique not only directs water from the ditch into the surrounding forest, but also ensures water on the road surface is directed there as well. The project was completed with $4,206 of Westmoreland County’s Dirt and Gravel Road allotment.

  7. In July of 2009 St. Clair Township completed maintenance on Furnace Lane. This project site was on of the original “hot spots” identified by Trout Unlimited that helped conceptualize the formation of the Dirt and Gravel Road program in 1999. The township used $6,280 of Westmoreland County’s Dirt and Gravel Road allotment to install grade breaks in the road to direct water off of the road’s surface, thus reducing erosion.
  8. White Oak Road drainage system system materials in place

    Laurel Mountain Borough completed its first project under the Dirt and Gravel Road program in August of 2007 when it performed maintenance on White Oak Road. This Borough presents some unique issues, when addressing water runoff, not typically seen by the Dirt and Gravel Road program. Rather than conventionally dispersing excess water off the site, all of the water on the Borough’s roads must be controlled in the right-of-way. The Borough used $9,450 of Westmoreland County’s Dirt and Gravel Road allotment to stabilize and control one-thousand feet of severely eroded road side ditch.

  9. Beechwood Road drainage system under construction

    Laurel Mountain Borough completed it’s second project under the Dirt and Gravel Road program in the summer of 2009 when it performed maintenance on Beechwood Road. This Borough presents some unique issues, when addressing water runoff, not typically seen by the Dirt and Gravel Road program. Rather than conventionally dispersing excess water off site, all of the water on the Borough’s roads must be controlled in the right-of-way. The Borough used $9,450 of Westmoreland County’s Dirt and Gravel Road allotment to stabilize and control 400 feet of badly eroded road side ditch.